Africa’s top 5 education priorities

Benefits of Private Sector- University Collaboration

At present Africa is dealing with a brutal combo: its school enrolment rate is the lowest in the world while its dropout rate is the highest. While one doesn’t expect the same figures as the developed world, Africa lags far behind the rest of the developing world too; in 2010 Sub-Saharan Africa’s overall enrolment rate was 17% compared with 48% in South Asia, 57% in East Asia and 70% in Latin America. Mass failings are another huge problem, with a high proportion of students throughout the continent graduating with an education that does not adequately equip them for the working world or tertiary education.

This episode of Invest Africa discusses  the role of the private sector in collaborating with universities to develop real and employable skills.

About Femi Oke

Relentless passion for creativity and digital acumen to help a professional services firm thrive in the digital space. Femi is an individual with a rich experience on regional African knowledge, its diverse business culture and he understands the continent’s economic drive. He thrives on selfless service and lasting mutually beneficial relationships with colleagues and especially clients encountered in the course of his duties. He is creative, practical and self-motivated with business judgement in corporate, brand and strategic communications, social, digital & traditional media and executive profiling. Roles in the firm include New Media, Digital Communication, Corporate Communication, executive profiling and Brand Management execution. Working on the multi-million dollar Africa high growth market project stands out for femi; besides this, managing all KPMG’s digital communication for the World Economic Forum on Africa is another project that gives him great delight. Femi holds a Masters Degree in Global Marketing from the University of Liverpool.

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